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After outcry, Mark Wahlberg donates $1.5 million film fee

Following an outcry over a significant disparity in pay between co-stars, Mark Wahlberg agreed Saturday to donate the $1.5 million he earned for reshoots for "All the Money in the World" to the sexual misconduct defense initiative Time's Up.

Wahlberg said he'll donate the money in the name of his co-star, Michelle Williams, who reportedly made less than $1,000 on the reshoots.

"I 100% support the fight for fair pay," Wahlberg said in a statement.

Williams issued a statement Saturday, saying: "Today isn't about me. My fellow actresses stood by me and stood up for me, my activist friends taught me to use my voice, and the most powerful men in charge, they listened and they acted."

She noted that "it takes equal effort and sacrifice" to make a film.

"Today is one of the most indelible days of my life because of Mark Wahlberg, WME (William Morris Endeavor) and a community of women and men who share in this accomplishment."

Wahlberg and his agency, William Morris Endeavor, donated $2 million to #Time'sUp, the legal defense fund founded in response to the #MeToo movement.

The announcement Saturday came after directors and stars, including Jessica Chastain and Judd Apatow, shared their shock at reports of the huge pay disparity for the Ridley Scott film. The 10 days of reshoots were necessary after Kevin Spacey was replaced by Christopher Plummer when accusations of sexual misconduct surfaced against Spacey. USA Today reported Williams was paid less than $1,000 for the 10 days.

Both Williams and Plummer were nominated for Golden Globes for their performances.

William Morris Endeavor said in a statement that wage disparity conversations should continue and "we are committed to being part of the solution."

YouTube suspends star over suicide video, doesn't shut door

YouTube has suspended a star who posted video images of what appeared to be a suicide victim but said Saturday that doesn't mean it won't work with him in the future.

The video service announced this week that it had pulled Logan Paul's channel from its ad-supported Google Preferred platform and put two other projects on hold.

YouTube chief business officer Robert Kyncl said Saturday there's no timetable for when Paul's future will be addressed again. Kyncl didn't shut YouTube's door on Paul.

"Everything is evolving so fast," Kyncl said. "The best thing we can do is put all projects on hold indefinitely, and there's no date or plan for him in the future."

Paul apologized for posting video of him in a forest near Mount Fuji in Japan near what seemed to be a body hanging from a tree. The location is known in Japan as a frequent site for suicides.

YouTube said the images violated its policies. Paul pulled the images from his channel on his own.

YouTube was criticized for moving slowly in response, taking nearly two weeks to take action. YouTube said on Twitter this week that critics were right to be frustrated by its initial lack of response.

Kyncl said Paul recognizes that he has made serious missteps and has expressed remorse for them.

"The most important thing to focus on is that actions speak louder than words and Logan has the opportunity to prove that," he said.

Removing Paul's work from the Google Preferred platform cuts off a significant route to advertising revenue through YouTube. YouTube also said it would not feature Paul in the fourth season of its series "Foursome" and would put other work on hold. Paul is one of the platform's biggest stars, with Forbes magazine estimating he earned $12.5 million last year.

YouTube said it would soon announce steps to protect advertisers from having their products connected to controversial material.

Julia Louis-Dreyfus marks chemo end with 'Beat It' video

Julia Louis-Dreyfus has marked the end of chemo by posting an Instagram video of her grown sons lip-syncing to Michael Jackson's "Beat It."

The "Veep" star and "Seinfeld" alum" said of Charlie and Henry, her two kids with Brad Hall: "Ain't they sweet?"

Louis-Dreyfus announced in September she had been diagnosed with breast cancer. She said she found out the day after winning an Emmy for "Veep." She's been sharing her journey and support from loved ones and fans on social media ever since.

The video is titled: "Mom's last chemo day!!! BEAT IT!!! Love, Henry and Charlie." Louis-Dreyfus called her sons "My beauty boys."

The video posted Friday had been viewed more than 500,000 times as of Saturday afternoon.

Louis-Dreyfus turned 57 Saturday.

Reports: London's Harrods to remove Diana memorial

Harrods, the luxury London department store and tourist destination, is reportedly planning to remove a memorial to Princess Diana and Dodi Fayed.

British media, including The Times and the BBC, reported Saturday that the bronze statue will be returned to Dodi's father, Mohammed Al Fayed, the Egyptian tycoon who previously owned Harrods.

The businessman commissioned the bronze statue depicting his son and Diana dancing after the two were killed in a Paris car crash in 1997.

The statue was installed in 2005 remained at Harrods after the Qatari royal family bought the store in 2010.

The news reports quoted Harrods managing director Michael Ward as saying that with a new Diana statue planned for Kensington Palace, it is the right time to return the one at the store to Al Fayed.

Keith Jackson, 89, announcer with 'Whoa, Nelly!' call, dies

Keith Jackson laid down the soundtrack to Saturday for a generation of college football fans with phrases such as his signature "Whoa, Nelly!" From the World Series to the Olympics, NFL to NBA, he did it all over five decades as a sportscaster, but most appropriately his final assignment before retiring 12 years ago was one of the greatest college football games ever.

Jackson died Friday. He was 89.

A statement by ESPN, which consolidated with ABC Sports, Jackson's longtime employer, announced his death Saturday. No cause was given. He was a longtime resident of Sherman Oaks, California, and died near his home there.

A native of west Georgia, near the Alabama border, his smooth baritone voice and use of phrases like "big uglies" for linemen gave his game calls a familiar feel.

"He was one of our giants," longtime broadcaster Brent Musburger told The Associated Press. "He could do anything and loved doing it."

Jackson might be best known for his "Whoa, Nelly!" exclamation, but he didn't overuse it. Borrowed from his great-grandfather, a farmer, the phrase also part of a commercial Jackson did for Miller Lite in the mid-'90s. But it was no catchphrase.

"He never made anything up," Musburger said. "That's how Keith talked."

In a Fox Sports interview in 2013, Jackson said his folksy language stemmed from his rural upbringing and he became comfortable with the usage through the years.

"I would go around and pluck things off the bush and see if I could find a different way to say some things. And the older I got the more willing I was to go back into the Southern vernacular because some of it's funny," Jackson said.

ESPN "College GameDay" host Rece Davis, who grew up in Alabama, said listening to Jackson assured him that it was OK for a national broadcaster to sound Southern.

"Some people become the voice of the sport through their expertise, which Keith certainly had. But it's almost as if the good Lord created that voice, which sounds like what red clay ought to sound like if it could talk, to be the perfect voice for college football," Davis told the AP.

Jackson is a member of the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame, and called more Rose Bowl games, 15, than any other announcer.

"When you heard his voice, you knew it was a big game," said Bob Iger, chairman and chief executive of The Walt Disney Co., which owns ESPN.

Jackson's death comes just three weeks after that of another sportscasting titan — Dick Enberg, known for his own excited calls of "Oh, my!" during a 60-year career.

Kirk Herbstreit was among the college football broadcasters paying tribute to Jackson on social media.

"Can close my eyes and think of so many of his special calls. Thank you Keith for all the memories and the grace in which you provided them," Herbstreit posted on Twitter.

After serving four years in the Marine Corps, Jackson broadcast his first college football game in 1952 as an undergraduate at Washington State. He worked in radio and television before joining ABC Sports in 1966.

Jackson first announced his retirement in 1998 but returned to work. He retired for good after the 2006 Rose Bowl, when he called Texas' upset of Southern California for the BCS championship on Vince Young's last-minute touchdown scramble.

"Fourth-and-5. The national championship on the line right here," Jackson said right before Young took the snap on that memorable play. "He's going for the cornerrrr. He's got it! Vince. Young. Scores."

The Rose Bowl stadium's radio and TV booths were renamed in his honor two years ago. He is in the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame for his contributions to the New Year's Day game, which is he credited with nicknaming "The Granddaddy of Them All."

Jackson was also the first play-by-play announcer on ABC's "Monday Night Football" telecasts before being replaced in the program's second season by Frank Gifford.

He called multiple World Series and baseball All-Star games, and was ABC's lead NBA play-by-play announcer. He worked college basketball with Dick Vitale, and covered 10 Olympics, calling swimming, track and field, basketball, speedskating and ski jumping.

Musburger recalled doing the radio play-by-play for the 1986 National League championship series between the Mets and Astros when Jackson was on the television call ABC. The series ended in the Astrodome with a dramatic, 16-inning victory in Game 6 by the Mets.

"Keith was in the television booth right next to me," Musburger said. "I'll never forget when the game was over, Keith's hand, and I didn't know whose hand it was, but it came around the corner extension into the radio booth and he offered me a vodka after the game to celebrate what we had been through."

Desmond Howard, who returned a punt for a touchdown at Michigan in one of Jackson's best-known calls, tweeted that he had a hard time expressing how much Jackson meant to him, his alma mater and college football.

"May his family find some comfort in knowing how much joy he brought us for so many years and that his legacy endures," Howard said.

Jackson is survived by his wife of 63 years, Turi Ann.

Funeral arrangements were not announced.

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Reeves reported from Birmingham, Alabama. AP Sports Writer Beth Harris in Los Angeles, Janie McCauley in Oakland, California, and Ralph D. Russo in New York contributed.

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More AP college football: https://collegefootball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25

Katie Couric shares thoughts on Matt Lauer's firing

Katie Couric shared her opinions about Matt Lauer's firing from the "Today" show in an exclusive People interview published Saturday.

Couric's opinion on the controversy was sought last month immediately after the bombshell sexual harassment and assault allegations against Lauer were made public, but at the time, Couric said that while the news was "incredibly upsetting," she wasn't ready to talk about it.

>> Read more trending news 

Couric, 61, and Lauer hosted the "Today" show together for 15 years. 

Couric told People that the allegations have been painful for her to learn, and that she had no idea such activity was going on during her "Today" tenure. Couric said that she and Lauer had a "brother-sister" relationship and that he treated her with respect. She also addressed a 2012 clip of her on Andy Cohen's late-night show when she said Lauer pinched her on the buttocks a lot. Couric told People the comment was a joke.

Couric called the allegations made against her former co-host "disturbing, distressing and disorienting” and said such behavior is “completely unacceptable.” 

Actress in next Woody Allen film donates salary to Time's Up

Actress Rebecca Hall says she's donating her salary from the latest Woody Allen film to Time's Up.

Hall says on Instagram she was hired for Allen's "A Rainy Day in New York" but is "profoundly sorry" and "regrets" her decision to work with the filmmaker. She said Friday she reconsidered the job after reviewing molestation accusations by Allen's daughter Dylan Farrow.

Allen denies molesting Dylan when she was 7.

Hall also appeared in Allen's 2008 "Vicky Cristina Barcelona." She says she was hired for the new film seven months ago but sees her "actions have made another woman feel silenced and dismissed." She hasn't said how much money she'll donate.

Time's Up is a sexual misconduct defense initiative started by women in Hollywood to support victims.

Legendary sportscaster Keith Jackson dead at 89

Keith Jackson, whose Southern drawl and homespun, folksy phrases endeared him to college football fans for more than half a century, died Friday night, ESPN reported. He was 89.

>> Read more trending news

Jackson died surrounded by his family, according to NBC Sports' Todd Harris.

Born in Roopville, Georgia, on Oct. 18, 1928, Jackson was also the first play-by-play broadcaster for “Monday Night Football” when it debuted in 1970 and covered a wide range of sports. He was known for his signature phrase “Whoa, Nellie!” after a big play. Jackson said the origin of the phrase came from his great-grandfather. He also coined the phrase “Big Uglies,” and christened Michigan’s football stadium “The Big House,” ESPN reported.

Jackson called 15 Rose Bowl games and was credited with calling the New Year’s Day game “The granddaddy of them all,” The New York Daily News reported. The final game he broadcast from Pasadena was the 2006 game in which Texas rallied to defeat USC for the national title.

Jackson was named national sportscaster of the year five times, the Daily News reported.

Jackson spent four years in the Marines and later graduated with a journalism degree from Washington State University, where he broadcast the team’s games.

He joined ABC’s college football announcing team in 1966, but also called NBA games, auto racing and was a staple on ABC’s “Wide World of Sports.” He also announced World Series games, 10 Olympics and traveled to 31 countries, ESPN reported.

Jackson also had fun playing off his signature phrase, as this commercial for Miller Lite demonstrates:

Tributes to Jackson rolled in on Twitter:

"Hamilton" creator celebrates after landmark pub is saved

A famed New York City pub that has been a part of the Washington Heights neighborhood landscape for decades is not closing after all.

After word got out earlier this week that Coogan's would be closing because of a rent increase, supporters including "Hamilton" creator Lin-Manuel Miranda rallied to save the local landmark. The New York Times reports more than 15,000 people signed a petition.

On Friday, Miranda was among those celebrating at Coogan's after the owners settled on a new lease with the property owners. Miranda said he's been visiting the restaurant since he was a boy. Lease terms were not disclosed.

Miranda even sang "Happy Birthday" to a diner.

Coogan's opened in 1985. Other famous patrons include former Vice President Al Gore, Hillary Clinton and singer Alicia Keys.

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Information from: The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com

Liam Neeson: "Bit of a witch hunt" over sex allegations

Actor Liam Neeson says the Hollywood sexual harassment scandal has sparked "a bit of a witch hunt."

Asked about the issue on the Irish broadcaster RTE, Neeson said: "There's some people, famous people, being suddenly accused of touching some girl's knee or something and suddenly they're being dropped from their program."

He referred to U.S. radio presenter and writer Garrison Keillor, who was dropped by Minnesota Public Radio last year over an allegation of "inappropriate behavior." Neeson said that wasn't the same as the "other Harvey Weinstein stuff." Neeson also said he was "on the fence" regarding sexual misconduct allegations against Dustin Hoffman.

But the 65-year-old "Taken" star also said in Friday's Late Late Show that the "#MeToo" movement taking place "across every industry (is) healthy."

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