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How much will you have to exercise to burn off that turkey dinner?

How many burpees does it take to burn off a dollop of gravy? How far must you run to negate a slice of holiday pie?

>> Read more trending news

The Daily Burn tallied the caloric cost of a Thanksgiving feast, and the results might make you second-guess that decision not to sign up for the local turkey trot.

>> Related: One ‘hot’ Thanksgiving: Turkeys get Flaming Hot Cheetos makeover

According to the Daily Burn’s helpful infographic, the turkey trot will take care of one slice of pie. That’s it. You’ll have to walk for 35 minutes to equalize a single 6-ounce glass of red wine, dance for 14 minutes to negate a half-cup of green bean casserole or play flag football for 20 minutes for that hot buttered roll. And you’ll have to run the stairs for 10 minutes to make up for that half-cup of stuffing.

>> Related: Thanksgiving 2017: How to fry a turkey without burning down the house

Most Americans gobble up between 2,400 and 4,500 calories in a single sitting on Thanksgiving Day, according to this article in The New York Times. That includes turkey, stuffing, a buttered roll, mashed potatoes and gravy, cranberry sauce, some green bean casserole, and slices of pecan and pumpkin pie. That’s more than an entire day’s calories, especially if you add a glass or two of wine to the mix.

We’re all for overindulgent feasting on such a special occasion, but it does help to balance out all the calories with some exercise.

David Cassidy’s younger brother Shaun offers touching tribute on Twitter

Teenage heartthrobs run in the Cassidy family. David Cassidy’s younger brother, Shaun Cassidy, who was also a teen idol and singer in the 1970s, remembered his late brother with a touching tribute on Twitter after the pop culture icon’s death Tuesday from organ failure.

>> Read more trending news

“When I was a little boy and my big brother would come to visit, the first call of business would be a punishing pillow fight. During the battle, he would regale me with hysterical stories of our father, often culminating in his taking a giant leap off my top bunk,” Cassidy posted on Twitter, along with a black and white photo of the boys as children.

“I tried to catch him of course. I always tried to catch him. But I never could. Now, I will carry him, along with all of the funny/sad/extraordinary days we shared, none more filled with love than these last few at his side.”

>> Related: ‘Partridge Family’ star, ‘70s teen idol David Cassidy dead at 67

Eight years younger than David, Shaun was the oldest son of Jack Cassidy and Shirley Jones, while David was Jack’s only child with his first wife, Evelyn Ward. In addition to being his step-mother, Shirley Jones played David Cassidy’s on-screen mother in the ‘70s musical sit-com “The Partridge Family.”

The relationship between Cassidy and his family was strained over the past years over his battle with alcoholism. Several months before his death, a video of Cassidy struggling to perform at a live show raised concerns about his well-being. Family and fans thought he had relapsed, instead he revealed he was suffering from dementia.

Regardless of past estrangements, his family rushed to his side after hearing of his hospitalization. A source told People magazine, Cassidy “was delighted to see them … There’s been total resolution within the family. They will always be there for him.”

David Cassidy passed away in a Florida hospital on Nov. 21. at the age of 67.

An outpouring of tributes came from celebrities, including Danny Bonaduce — who played David’s television brother — John Stamos, Marie Osmond and Carnie Wilson.

>> Related: Music legend and 'Touched by an Angel' star Della Reese dead at 86

Cassidy is survived by half-brothers Shaun, Patrick and Ryan; daughter Katie Cassidy and son, actor Beau Cassidy.

Woman pulled over by man impersonating law enforcement officer

A man impersonating a law enforcement officer pulled over a woman in Arkansas, according to the St. Francis County Sheriff’s Office.

The incident happened Saturday on Highway 38 near Hughes.

>> Read more trending news

Investigators said a man impersonating a game and fish officer stopped a woman and asked to check her vehicle for guns. He had a blue light on his dash and was in a dark-colored pickup truck.

The man did not show the woman a badge or a weapon. The incident happened during the daytime hours and appears to have been an isolated occurrence.

Investigators said they believe they know who the man is, but no arrests were immediately made.

Officials said the impersonator is not the same one who stopped people earlier this year.

Felon Sentenced to Life in Prison Released Early, Now Charged with Murder

Felon Sentenced to Life in Prison Released Early, Now Charged with Murder

Mother accused of using kids to steal from Macy’s, police say

Police in Austin, Texas, are looking for a woman who they say stole merchandise from a Macy’s department store with the help of another woman and four children no older than 10 years old.

>> Read more trending news

Investigators are looking for 27-year-old Martha Monique Lopez, who is charged with robbery by assault, according to an arrest affidavit filed this week.

On Nov. 12, police received a call around 2 p.m. from a store employee who watches for shoplifters at the Macy’s in the Domain shopping center. She told police she was watching the children, who were between 7 and 10 years old, through a security camera. According to the affidavit, they re-entered the store and met two women near the hotel bedding and pillow area.

The store worker told police that she saw the women point to some pillows, which the children then picked up before they “exited the store past the last point of purchase without attempting to pay for the items,” the affidavit said. The worker said in the affidavit that she confronted the children and identified herself as a Macy’s employee, after which point she said the children complied and started to come back with her to a store office.

The employee told police that as they were going back to the office, the two women approached her and one of them told her to let the children go and then pushed her, according to the affidavit. The other woman and the children began running away, the employee told police. She tried to grab the children, but the “female who told her to let her children go began to punch (her) on the left side of her face, chest and left arm with a closed fist causing (her) pain and redness,” the affidavit said.

The employee told police that she “tried to grab the female to detain her but the female took off running and (she) ripped (the woman’s) shirt off of her and the female ran out of the store wearing just a black bra,” the affidavit said.

A customer saw the woman running from the store and saw her and the children get into a white 2009 Chevy Malibu with a Texas license plate that matched a car registered to Lopez, according to the affidavit. Lopez was also identified by the store worker from a photo taken during a previous arrest, police said.

Could medical marijuana help fight the opioid epidemic?

New research suggests medical cannabis may play a key role in ending the opioid epidemic plaguing the nation.

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The findings from Aclara Research, a cannabis patient and consumer insights group, come soon after President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency in the U.S. as an estimated 175 Americans die from opioids each day.

The study, which will be released in full in early 2018, was conducted in partnership with pharmacists active in the cannabis industry and included online surveys of more than 400 patients using prescription opioids nationwide.

» RELATED: Trump declares US opioid emergency but pledges no new money

Researchers also examined 500 pharmacists’ perceptions of medical cannabis and its role in the industry.

According to the Aclara study, the preliminary findings showed that 67 percent of the patients stopped using opioid medications after using medical cannabis.

» RELATED: Walgreens to begin selling OTC Narcan to combat opioid epidemic

And another 29 percent reported a decrease in the number of opioid medications used after starting medical cannabis.

Thirty percent of the patients said they stopped using any and all prescription drugs after using medical marijuana.

» RELATED: US gun death rate up for second straight year, drug deaths rising faster than ever

Of the 500 pharmacists surveyed, 87 percent said medical cannabis should be legalized, and 69 percent said pharmacists should dispense medical cannabis and counsel patients on medical cannabis use.

Another recent study, published in the Public Library of Science last week, found opioid users were more likely to stop usage if they had access to medical marijuana.

» RELATED: What is fentanyl? 10 things to know about the potentially deadly drug

That study involved 66 patients using opioids to treat chronic pain. Over a 21-month period, patients who used medical cannabis were 17 times more likely to stop using opioids, and patients who didn’t use cannabis on average increased their opioid use by 10 percent over that time period, according to the research. 

Research from 2014, published in the Journal of the American Medical Associationalso found states that had legalized medical marijuana saw lower rates of fatal opioid overdoses.

Aclara researchers said they will continue to collect data and examine the results in conjunction with additional pharmacy partners. The study’s final results will be released in January 2018.

Read more about the study at aclararesearch.com.

Michael Jordan replaces family’s signed jersey stolen from home after fire

A family received a surprise from NBA legend Michael Jordan after one of his signed jerseys was stolen from their home when it burned down in October.

Officials with the Dunn County Sheriff’s Office said the family was forced out of its Rock Creek, Wisconsin, home on Oct. 11 when it caught fire. 

>> Read more trending news

Authorities said a family member went to the house on Nov. 2, after the fire, and noticed two men behind it with a vehicle. The family member told officials that the men said they were looting the house and then left with a garbage can full of items. 

Authorities said they later arrested one of the men. 

According to officials, a signed No. 45 Michael Jordan jersey was among the items taken by the men and is believed to have been sold. 

The Star Tribune reported Monday that the family’s daughter, Kelsey Schiel, got the item signed by Jordan at his Chicago restaurant in 1995. The meetup was coordinated by Starlight Children's Foundation, an organization that supports hospitalized children and their families. At the time, Schiel was battling a life-threatening illness. Now 28, she has beaten the disease that she now likes to keep private.

“It’s devastating to know that someone stole such an important item,” Schiel said. “I really hope that whoever has it realizes its importance and turns it in. We won’t ask questions; it’s just really special to me.”

According to the Star Tribune, Jordan heard about the robbery and is having the jersey replaced.

“Michael was very sorry to hear about what happened to the Schiel family and was happy to send Kelsey a new signed jersey,” a representative for Jordan said.

Spit test could diagnose concussion in kids, study says

It can be difficult to tell how a long a concussion will last. However, a spit test may soon be able to diagnose and determine the duration, according to a new a report. 

>> Read more trending news

Researchers from Penn State University recently conducted a small experiment, published in the JAMA Pediatrics journal, to explore whether saliva can be used to identify prolonged concussion symptoms, which can include nausea, vomiting, dizziness, balance problems, double or blurry vision. 

First, they examined saliva, discovering that it contains five small molecules called microRNAs, which influence protein levels. 

MicroRNAs also exhibit some predictive functions, because they include genetic fragments that reveal specific information about an individual’s health.

“Because of their abundance, stability in fluctuating pH levels, resistance to enzymatic degradation, and essential role in transcriptional regulation, miRNAs make ideal biomarkers,” the study read.

>> Related: Which high school sports have the most concussions? 

They then tested their theory by observing 52 children, teens and young adults. They measured the patients’ microRNAs by asking them to spit in cups. 

After analyzing the results, they found the microRNAs in saliva correctly identified children and adolescents with concussions 85 percent of the time. It also identified  those who had symptoms for at least a month. Standard surveys commonly used by doctors are only about 65 percent accurate.

Researchers said a concussion spit test could offer several benefits, including management of the condition and symptom testing.

“The miRNAs associated with prolonged concussion symptoms have potential utility as a toolset for facilitating concussion management. This tool could ease parental anxiety about expected symptom duration. An objective prolonged concussion symptoms tool could also inform clinical recommendations about return-to-play and school-based accommodations,” the authors wrote

Researchers did note that some patients used anti-inflammatory medicine, which could have altered their findings. They also acknowledged the size of the of study, explaining that a larger cohort would be needed to verify conclusions. 

>> Related: Football players under 12 at high risk of brain injury, study finds

In the future, they hope to study other biomarkers, such as blood, that could also yield the same results. 

New York AG investigating fraudulent net neutrality comments to FCC

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said Tuesday that his office is investigating tens of thousands of comments posted to a notice of the FCC’s proposed change to net neutrality rules after learning that they were made by impersonators.

>> Read more trending news

The investigation was launched six months ago, after researchers and reporters learned that the comment process, which is integral to the agency’s procedure for determining such rule changes, was being usurped by fraudsters who submitted an enormous number of fake comments, Schneiderman said Tuesday in an open letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai.

“While some of these fake comments used made up names and addresses, many misused the real names and addresses of actual people as part of the effort to undermine the integrity of the comment process,” Schneiderman wrote. “That’s akin to identity theft, and it happened on a massive scale.”

He said that the identities of tens of thousands of New Yorkers were fraudulently used.

“Analysis showed that, in all, hundreds of thousands of Americans likely were victimized in the same way, including tens of thousands per state in California, Georgia, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and possibly others,” Schneiderman wrote.

He said his office tried nine times over the course of five months to get records from the FCC necessary to investigate the apparent identity theft. He said his office and the FCC have shared information with one another before, but that despite offers to keep the records confidential, as done in the past, New York officials have “received no substantive response to our investigative requests.” 

“We all have a powerful reason to hold accountable those who would steal Americans’ identities and assault the public’s right to be heard in government rule making,” Schneiderman wrote. “If law enforcement can’t investigate and (where appropriate) prosecute when it happens on this scale, the door is open for it to happen again and again.”

He urged Pai and the FCC to “reconsider its refusal to assist in my office’s law enforcement investigation.”

“In an era where foreign governments have indisputably tried to use the internet and social media to influence our elections, federal and state governments should be working together to ensure that malevolent actors cannot subvert our administrative agencies’ decision-making processes,” he wrote.

Pai previously pledged to try to repeal the net neutrality regulations enacted under the Obama administration, which treat internet service providers as if they were utility companies that provide essential services, like electricity. The rules mandate that they give equal access to all online content and apps.

Pai distributed his alternative net neutrality rule plan to other FCC commissioners Tuesday in preparation for a Dec. 14 vote. Although the FCC’s two Democrats said they will oppose the proposal, the repeal is likely to prevail as Republicans dominate 3-2. The vote for net neutrality in 2015 was also along party lines, but Democrats dominated then.

Schneiderman said that his office’s investigation is not about net neutrality, but is instead about “the right to control one’s own identity and prevent the corruption of a process designed to solicit the opinion of real people and institutions.”

“Misuse of identity online by the hundreds of thousands should concern everyone – for and against net neutrality, New Yorker or Texan, Democrat or Republican,” Schneiderman said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Former cop used to solve crimes; now he cleans up after them

The man shot his wife first. Then himself.

When cops arrived they found the murdered woman in a chair. Her husband’s body was on the sofa nearby. The living room was a tragic tableau.

Atlanta Police Det. Pat Apoian was among the responders. As he and his colleagues processed the scene, he thought about what would happen once they were done. The murder-suicide wasn’t much of a mystery, and after the bodies were removed, the couple’s adult children would be left to deal not only with the awful deaths but the horrific mess left behind.

“These poor kids. They’re going to have to clean this up,” he remembers thinking.

That was in 2009, two years before the night Apoian was dragged by a car with a fleeing suspect at the wheel. The car nearly tore off his foot and left him with a broken leg and a damaged hand. It ripped his sternum from his rib cage, fractured his pelvis and spine and tore the muscle from one shoulder. He endured multiple surgeries, recovery (both mental and physical) was painful and slow, and he ended up retiring from law enforcement.

MORE PHOTOS

FROM THE AJC ARCHIVES: Officer down, but not out

In contemplating his next chapter, Apoian, who has a young son and daughter, wanted to put his background to work in a new career that would allow him to keep helping people. He and his wife, Sandra, have become Spaulding Decon franchisees. The firm specializes in environmental cleanups, responding to crime scenes, hoarding situations, mold or other biohazard contaminations – even meth lab mitigation.

“I feel like I’m still helping people,” he said. “I want to show up and make an impact.”

Just before Thanksgiving, he and his employees helped a distraught Roswell woman reclaim the holiday. Meredith Wilbanks had what she thought was a dripping sink. In fact, her dishwasher had been steadily leaking for who knows how long, and dangerous black mold was creeping along the inside of her kitchen island and cabinets and underneath her tile and carpet.

“I was really, really stressed,” she said. Not only was her house a wreck, but the thought of having to celebrate the holidays elsewhere this year left her in tears. Her father died in a car wreck in January, and spending the holiday season at home with family felt more vital than ever this year.

“To not be able to have Thanksgiving and Christmas here, I was panicked,” she said, her eyes welling up as she remembered how much her dad loved family gatherings this time of year. “He was all into Christmas.”

Wilbanks’ mom learned of Apoian’s company through a friend in a grief support group.

“I talked to him about his story and I told him about my dad,” Wilbanks said. “I feel like it was meant to be.”

A Long Island native with family and friends in blue, Apoian seemed born for the badge. Residents of Atlanta’s Zone 6 grew to know him as a guy interested in keeping the peace but also in getting to know them.

“He’s concerned about people. He talks to people,” Darrell White once told us when we were walking the beat with Apoian in 2013, before he retired. “It’s hard to find officers like that.”

Apoian used to fold his 6-foot frame into a library chair for story time at the elementary school in his zone, and once patiently “investigated” when an elderly woman dialed 911 to report terrorists had placed deadly powder in her mailbox. No ma’am, he reassured her, a bird took a bathroom break there.

“People still call me,” he said. He recently helped a crime victim navigate the system to report an assault. That suspect is now in jail. A different victim called Apoian for guidance in handling things after his home was burglarized. “I still feel connected.”

A case his company worked a few months ago reminded him of crime scenes he used to process. The client owned rental property she hadn’t visited in a while. Her tenant turned out to be an extreme hoarder.

“We found six decomposed cats,” he said. “Everywhere you can imagine there was cat mess. The showers, the tubs, the sinks, the countertops. The garbage was piled up on the porch, on the back deck.”

In responding to the nightmarish scene, Apoian drew upon the empathy he developed on the force.

“I always look at it as trying to see what was invisible to everybody else. Was there something there no one could see?” he said. “If I would see a prostitute I would think, ‘What got her there?'”

He took a non-judgmental approach to the hoarding case, and it has a happy ending. The home’s back to normal.

Apoian hasn’t responded to a death scene yet but grimly notes that it’s just a matter of time. He is, unfortunately, well-prepared, having responded to countless homicide, suicide and unattended death scenes. It’s hard to say which is worse.

“If it’s an unattended death your body basically melts. You literally melt into the floor boards,” he said. “God forbid it’s a self-inflicted gunshot wound.”

He didn’t want to give a lot of details about what that’s like, but recalls the gentle approach he would take to dissuade family members who wanted to see for themselves.

“You want to keep the family out. You’re keeping them from that being the last memory,” he said. “It adds a whole new level of heartbreak.”

He misses police work but still lives up to the ideals he upheld after joining the Atlanta Police Department in 2002. As a New Yorker who lived not far from the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, he’d actually thought of joining the military. His wife put an end to that plan, so Apoian instead decided to follow the example of his childhood mentor Bill Murphy, a Nassau County, N.Y., police officer who’d led fundraising efforts for the Police Athletic League.

Apoian pinned on his badge with Officer Murphy’s mantra in his mind, and he stays true to it today: “Always be remembered for the good that you do.”

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