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Posted: August 10, 2017

Not ready for kids? New at-home fertility test gives women better data on eggs, fertility timeline 

Sam Edwards

By Fiza Pirani, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Afton Vechery, formerly of 23AndMe, and Carly Leahy, former executive at Uber, want to make women’s reproductive data accessible, affordable and simpler to comprehend.

» RELATED: Mid-life mothering: risky or rewarding? 

Their new venture Modern Fertility, which launched Wednesday, is the first comprehensive at-home fertility test focused on giving women the most accurate data about their reproductive timeline.

» RELATED: 72-year-old woman gives birth to her first child 

Its main target is young women who want a family someday, but not necessarily anytime soon, a trend that has increased among young women over the past few decades.

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In fact, according to the Census, in 1976, 68 percent of 29-year-old women had a child. In 2016, only 40 percent did.

And between 2006 and 2010, 7.4 million women (11.9 percent) said they received infertility services, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Survey of Family Growth.

» RELATED: Woman, 59, who tried for decades to get pregnant gives birth 

“As we get older, fertility becomes a giant egg-shaped question mark. One second we’re preventing pregnancy and the next second, we’re panicking. It’s an abrupt shift and there’s virtually no information in between,” the Modern Fertility co-founders wrote in a blog post Wednesday.

» RELATED: US teen birth rates just hit an all-time low, CDC says

And the doctors they consulted in their research said women usually wait too long to freeze their eggs.

Both women view this lack of information and of accessibility as a public health issue, Vechery told Forbes.

“Every woman should have this information,” she said.

The new at-home kit features the same laboratory tests available at fertility clinics, but at a better price.

» RELATED: Mobile app designed to prevent pregnancy approved in Europe

According to TechCrunch, comparable kits are priced at more than double Modern Fertility’s pre-order price of $149. For example, Future Family’s kits are about $600 and Everlywell, $400.


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