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Actress Heather Locklear hospitalized for psychiatric evaluation, police say

Actress Heather Locklear was hospitalized Sunday in Thousand Oaks, California, for a psychiatric evaluation, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office confirmed to Us magazine.

>> Read more trending news 

Locklear, 56, who starred on “Melrose Place” and “Dynasty,” was acting erratically and threatened to hurt herself, a police source told Us. The source told Us that a family member called 911.

According to TMZ, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office and the Ventura County Fire Department responded to the 911 call and went to Locklear’s home.

According to a 911 audio dispatch call obtained by TMZ, the family member called 911 and said Locklear was looking for a gun to shoot herself.

>> Heather Locklear arrested on suspicion of domestic violence

Police told Us that there was no crime committed at Locklear’s home, “only a medical issue.”

Locklear was arrested Feb. 26 on a felony charge of domestic violence and three counts of misdemeanor battery on a police officer after a dispute with her boyfriend, Chris Heisser.

Private jet once owned by Elvis Presley for sale _ again

A private jet once owned by Elvis Presley that has sat on a runway in New Mexico for nearly four decades is back on the auction block.

The online auction site IronPlanet announced this week that the plane with red velvet seats had returned the market after its current owner bought it last year for $430,000.

A previous auction house says Elvis designed the interior that has gold-tone woodwork, red velvet seats and red shag carpet. But the red 1962 Lockheed Jetstar has no engine and needs a restoration of its cockpit.

The plane was owned by Elvis and his father, Vernon Presley.

It has been privately owned for 36 years and sitting on a tarmac in Roswell, New Mexico.

Lindsay Goldstein, a spokeswoman for IronPlanet, said the jet is still grounded in Roswell and the current owner "has not made any changes to this piece of history."

Photos of the plane also show the exterior in need of restoration and seats of the cockpit torn.

A previous owner disputed an auction house's claim the king of rock 'n' roll designed its red velvet interior.

Roy McKay told KOB-TV in Albuquerque (https://goo.gl/GpE3zV) he designed the interior himself. McKay said that when he purchased the jet, it had a two-toned gray interior and "kind of looked like a casket."

But then-GWS Auctions Inc. spokesman Carl Carter told The Associated Press the auction house is confident Elvis designed the interior, which photos show has red velvet seats and red shag carpet.

IronPlanet also is confident Elvis designed its red velvet interior, Goldstein said.

Federal Aviation Administration records show no interior changes were ever made to the jet, Carter said.

IronPlanet is accepting online bids for the plane until July 27.

Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, on Jan. 8, 1935, and moved to Memphis, Tennessee, with his parents at age 13. He became a leading figure in the fledgling rockabilly scene by covering songs originally performed by African-American artists like Big Mama Thornton ("Hound Dog") and Arthur Crudup ("That's All Right").

His provocative dancing and hit records turned him into one of the 20th century's most recognizable icons. Historians say his music also helped usher in the fall of racial segregation.

Elvis was 42 when he died on Aug. 16, 1977, in Memphis.

___

Associated Press writer Russell Contreras is a member of the AP's race and ethnicity team. Follow Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras

Geraldine McCaughrean wins Carnegie children's book prize

British writer Geraldine McCaughrean has won the prestigious Carnegie Medal for children's literature for "Where the World Ends."

McCaughrean was named the winner Monday for her novel about two Scottish boys marooned at sea. She also won the prize, chosen by children's librarians, in 1988.

In her acceptance speech, McCaughrean criticized publishers for vetoing complex language in children's books, saying "we master words by meeting them, not by avoiding them."

The Kate Greenaway Medal for illustration went to Canada's Sydney Smith for illustrating "Town is by the Sea," a tale of childhood in a Nova Scotia coal-mining community.

The Carnegie is Britain's oldest children's book prize, named for Scottish-born U.S. philanthropist Andrew Carnegie. It and the Greenaway award are open to works published in the U.K. in the previous year.

New study finds continued gender disparity in book coverage

A new study finds that few of the top literary publications are giving equal time to women authors and reviewers.

The highly anticipated "VIDA Count," released Monday, has The New Yorker, The Nation and The Atlantic among those devoting less than 40 percent of their book coverage to women in 2017. Only two of 15 publications analyzed in the main VIDA count gave women 50 percent or more — Poetry magazine and Granta. Those between 40 percent and 49 percent include The New York Times Book Review and the Paris Review, from which editor Lorin Stein resigned last December amid allegations of sexual harassment. In April, the magazine hired Emily Nemens, only the second woman to run the Paris Review in its 65-year history.

VIDA, a nonprofit feminist organization otherwise known as Women in Literary Arts, found far stronger numbers for women in smaller publications. A Public Space, Agni and Conjunctions were among those in VIDA's "Larger Literary Landscape" giving women well over half of their coverage.

"We believe VIDA really is making a difference," VIDA Review editor-in-chief Amy King and assistant editor Sarah Clark wrote in the report's introduction. "The numbers may not radically change year to year, they may reach parity for some publications one year and fall back the next. But we can see the impact of our work beyond VIDA's numbers."

The numbers for 2017 are the first to come out in the #MeToo era and King told The Associated Press during a recent interview that she expected the movement to make an impact, although one that "may be measured publication by publication, rather than as an overall widespread effect." She noted the recent decision by the Boston Review to keep Junot Diaz as the fiction editor even after the Pulitzer Prize-winning author faced harassment allegations. Three poetry editors resigned in protest, while the Review's editors-in-chief defended their decision because Diaz's behavior didn't rise to the "severity that animated the #MeToo movement."

At the Review last year, men received more than 60 percent of coverage, according to VIDA.

"Editors can only coast along for so long on excuses that began as 'we're just publishing the best work,' now morphing into pardons in cases of abuse of power with 'He made mistakes, but he's still a good editor," said King, who also serves on VIDA's executive board.

VIDA has been tallying gender disparities in literary journalism for nearly a decade, when it startled many in the publishing world by documenting the predominance of books by men, and reviewed by men, in The New Yorker, Harper's, The New Republic and elsewhere. While Poetry, The New Republic and other publications have significantly increased the percentage of women reviewers and of books reviewed by women authors, some have changed more sporadically. At The New York Review of Books, men outnumbered women by 5-to-1 in the VIDA report for 2010. The ratio narrowed to nearly even in 2016, but last year fell back to 3-to-1.

As in previous years, the 2017 charts were compiled by VIDA volunteers.

_____

Online:

www.vidaweb.org

‘Incredibles 2’ comes with epilepsy warning

It’s been 14 years since the Parr family was on the big screen as “The Incredibles,” and it seems like fans have been waiting for the sequel as “Incredibles 2” crushed box office records, taking in an estimated $180 million in its opening domestic weekend, CNN reported.

But the film is now coming with a warning for those who suffer from epilepsy or other conditions, USAToday reported.

>> Read more trending news 

There is a segment of the movie that shows bright flashing lights used by the villain Screenslaver, USAToday reported.

There were warnings on social media from theater goers after last week’s premiere of “Incredibles 2” alerting fans with epilepsy, migraines or chronic illness that the mind control scenes could trigger seizures. 

The Epilepsy Foundation also issued a warning.

On Friday, Walt Disney Pictures took it a step further, requesting that theaters showing the film warn viewers about the scene, USAToday reported.

A theater supervisor for a Los Angeles AMC theater location told USAToday he has never had an alert like that before from a studio.

The Epilepsy Foundation says 3 percent of people with epilepsy can have seizures if exposed to some flashing lights. 

Roll out the barrels: Christo artwork floats on London lake

The ducks, geese and hardy cold-water swimmers in London's Hyde Park have a new neighbor: a monumental floating structure made from 7,506 stacked barrels colored bright red, mauve and blue.

"The London Mastaba," unveiled Monday, is the latest installation by Christo, a master of supersized artworks who has previously wrapped Berlin's Reichstag in silver fabric and festooned New York's Central Park with thousands of saffron-colored cloth gates.

The 83-year-old artist's first major creation in London rises 65 feet (20 meters) above the surface of the park's Serpentine Lake. Its slope-sided trapezoid was inspired by ancient Mesopotamian benches and Egyptian tombs. The colors have been chosen to complement the lush greenery and gray-blue skies of a London summer.

The sculpture, which will float on the lake until Sept. 23, is accompanied by an exhibition at the nearby Serpentine Gallery tracing the barrel-based artworks Christo has created since the 1950s — often with his wife and artistic partner, Jeanne-Claude, who died in 2009.

The pair started experimenting with paint cans and upsized to oil drums, using them to create walls, mounds and other structures both monumental and temporary.

Many of their grander schemes have never been built. Others took decades.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude first dreamed of a floating mastaba — Arabic for bench — in 1967. Initially it was to be built on Lake Michigan. Five decades later, it has finally arisen in London.

Since 1977, Christo has been planning an even bigger version: a mastaba set in the Abu Dhabi desert that would be made from 410,000 barrels, rise 500 feet (150 meters) and constitute the largest sculpture in the world.

Like Christo's other works, "The London Mastaba" is temporary. At summer's end it will be dismantled and the barrels recycled, in keeping with Christo's "leave no trace" philosophy.

For now, it floats serenely, drawing a mixed reaction from the walkers, joggers and cyclists who use the park each day.

Local Lucia Halpern, who watched the work being constructed in the park over two months, said her cockapoo Coco was a fan, "because it keeps the ducks away and she can go in the water."

But she declared herself "a bit disappointed" by the structure.

"The only thing I find beautiful about it is the reflection in the water," she said. "Maybe that's the point. It's quite pretty when it gets the light and puts these magenta and pink colors on the water."

The Bulgaria-born, New York-based Christo is unconcerned about getting divergent reviews.

"Any interpretation is legitimate — critical or positive," he said. "All make you think. This is why we are human — to think."

Smooth criminal? Michael Jackson's former elephant briefly escapes Florida zoo enclosure

On Sunday afternoon, Ali the African elephant briefly wandered through an open gate into a contained courtyard behind the giraffe and elephant night house, according to press release from Florida's Jacksonville Zoo.

>> Watch the news report here

He was quickly returned and secured in a holding enclosure, the zoo said.

There were no guests, staff members or animals, including Ali, injured during the incident, according to the zoo.

The zoo said incident was a result of human error. When the elephant keepers realized Ali was not in his holding yard, they called a “code-red."

>> Read more trending news 

While no guests were in danger, any time an animal is not where it is supposed to be, established safety protocols go into effect, according to the release.

Ali was donated in 1997 from Michael Jackson’s Neverland Ranch, according to the zoo.

>> See the zoo's Facebook post here

Michael Jackson's elephant escapes enclosure at Florida zoo

An elephant that once lived at Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch briefly escaped its enclosure at a Florida zoo.

The Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens posted on Facebook that Ali the bull elephant wandered through a gate that was accidentally left open Sunday and wound up in a courtyard behind the giraffe and elephant barn.

The zoo said guests weren't endangered and safety protocols were quickly put into place.

Zoo staff used food to entice the elephant back into the enclosure. Ali was loose for about 20 minutes.

Thomas Markle says Prince Harry said to give Trump a chance

The father of the former Meghan Markle says he talked politics with Prince Harry over the phone — and Harry argued that he should give President Donald Trump a chance.

Thomas Markle told broadcaster ITV on Monday that he had several phone conversations with Harry, including one in which the prince asked for permission to marry his daughter.

Markle said Trump was discussed at least once: "Our conversation was I was complaining about not liking Donald Trump, he said 'give Donald Trump a chance'. I sort of disagreed with that."

Markle said he also asked his future son-in-law about Britain's 2016 decision to leave the European Union and got the impression Harry is comfortable with Brexit.

"I think he was open to the experiment," Markle said.

Harry's press office declined to comment on Markle's televised interview, which could raise eyebrows because senior royal figures are scrupulously careful not to comment publicly on domestic or international political affairs.

Markle, who had been scheduled to walk his daughter down the aisle, missed the royal wedding in May due to heart problems. He told ITV he was "doing much better" and that he regretted missing the big event.

The 73-year-old Markle, who watched the wedding from California, says he was "very proud" but that "the unfortunate thing for me now is I'm a footnote in one of the greatest moments in history rather than the dad walking her down the aisle."

He says the couple, now known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, will probably seek to have children soon.

"She's wanted children for a long time," he said.

Markle said he gave Harry permission to marry his daughter over the phone.

"Harry asked for her hand on the phone and I said: 'You are a gentleman, promise me you will never raise your hand against my daughter and of course I will grant you my permission. "'

___

Associated Press writer Danica Kirka contributed.

Report: CAR foreign minister says Boris Becker not diplomat

Central African Republic's foreign minister reportedly says that retired German tennis star Boris Becker doesn't have diplomatic status in his unpaid role as a sports attache for the country.

Becker claims that his role gives him diplomatic immunity from bankruptcy proceedings in Britain. He argues that, as CAR's attache to the European Union on sporting, cultural and humanitarian affairs, he's covered by a 1961 convention on diplomatic relations.

But the African country's foreign minister, Charles Armel Doubane, was quoted Monday as telling German daily Die Welt that "Boris Becker is not an official diplomat of Central African Republic." He said that he would have had to sign a document giving Becker that status, but was never asked to.

Doubane said his country won't obstruct justice in any case against Becker.

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