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Senior citizens earn thousands by sharing their homes, says Airbnb

Thousands of senior citizens across the United States are finding a profitable side hustle --- opening up their homes to strangers on Airbnb.

Nearly 78,000 seniors (ages 60 and up) across the U.S. shared their homes on Airbnb in 2017 -- accounting for $700 million in earnings, the company reports.

The typical host earned an extra $7,000 in income a year -- a positive boost for people living on fixed incomes.

>> Read more trending news 

Airbnb is a website that allows people to open up their homes for vacation rentals or short-term leasing. There are over 5 million homes listed on Airbnb in over 81,000 cities.

According to Airbnb’s annual survey, 41 percent of seniors reported that hosting their home has helped them afford to stay in their homes -- places they’ve often lived most of their lives. 

Airbnb states that 45 percent of senior hosts rely on that extra income to make ends meet and spend it on important costs of living. 

Senior hosts are beloved on Airbnb, the company said.

88 percent of trips hosted by seniors last year resulted in 5-star reviews.

Percentage of active listings with senior Airbnb hosts 

New Mexico34%Maine32%Vermont28%Hawaii26%Delaware26%

 

Typical host earnings for seniors by state 

Hawaii$14,000California$11,700Washington, D.C.$10,500Washington$8,700Rhode Island$8,500

Percentage of senior host reviews with 5-stars 

Nebraska93%North Dakota93%Kansas93%South Dakota92%Indiana91%

Teen girl helps blind, deaf man by signing into his hands on Alaska Air flight

A teen girl helped a blind, deaf man communicate on a recent Alaska Airlines flight, according to KIRO.

Dianne McGinness with Alaska Airlines shared the heartwarming story after a passenger on the flight wrote a post this week about the interaction that was shared over 400,000 times.

The passenger, Lynette Scribner, was traveling on the same flight as the teen and man, and was moved to write a post on the touching encounter. 

>> Read more trending news 

Scribner said the man, Tim Cook, was traveling home to Portland after visiting his sister. Cook lives at Portland's Brookdale Senior Living. 

When passengers of the flight realized Cook was blind and deaf, many helped ensure he was comfortable. A man sitting next to Cook gave him the aisle seat and helped with little tasks like opening his coffee creamer and pouring it into his coffee, Scribner shared.

A flight attendant made an announcement asking if a passenger on board knew American Sign Language. Fifteen-year-old Clara Daly, who has studied ASL for the last year, rang her call button.

When Daly learned the man could communicate only if someone signed into his hand, she immediately went to help.

Cook asked Daly questions and she patiently sign-spelled answers into his hand.

Scribner said Daly learned ASL because she has dyslexia, and it was the easiest foreign language for her to learn.

“Clara was amazing,” an Alaska Airlines flight attendant said in the news release. “You could tell Tim was very excited to have someone he could speak to -- and she was such an angel.”

“When (Cook) asked (Daly) if she was pretty, she blushed and laughed as the seat mate, who had learned a few signs, communicated an enthusiastic yes to Tim,” Scribner shared. “I don't know when I've ever seen so many people rally to take care of another human being. All of us in the immediate rows were laughing and smiling and enjoying his obvious delight in having someone to talk to.”

After the flight, McGinness said Cook met a service provider from Brookdale Senior Living at the gate.

Cook said the flight was the best trip he's ever taken.

Daly told her mom she thought the encounter was "meant to be," since her original flight was canceled and she was redirected to Cook's flight.

On Thursday, Scribner added a note on her beloved post: “We are all starving for good news and this was just what we needed.”

Anthony Bourdain’s mother plans to get memorial tattoo

Anthony Bourdain’s mother revealed that while she was “never really a fan” of her son’s tattoos, she plans to get one in his memory.

Gladys Bourdain told the New York Times that she plans to get “Tony” tattooed in small letters on the inside of her wrist some time next week, and use his tattoo artist.

>> Read more trending news 

The 61-year-old chef and host of CNN’s “Parts Unknown” was found dead on June 8 in a hotel room in France.

Investigators say he hanged himself.

On Friday, a prosecutor said Bourdain had no traces of drugs or alcohol in his system. 

The famous chef had several tattoos, getting his first at 44.

Bourdain told Maxim in August 2017 that each tattoo marks a significant moment in his life.

“I don't overly place importance on them, but [tattoos] do commemorate in a way that photographs can't,” Bourdain said. “I stopped taking photographs a long time ago when I travel. There's this realization that the lens is inadequate to capture the moment, so maybe I'm just looking to mark time in another way that's very personal.”

Gladys Bourdain said that a private ceremony will be held soon, adding, “He would want as little fuss as possible.”

A Bourdain family spokesperson told the BBC the family has no plans for a public memorial at this time.

Sarah Huckabee Sanders kicked out of Red Hen restaurant in Virginia on ‘moral’ grounds

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said she and seven members of her family were kicked out of The Red Hen restaurant in Lexington, Virginia on Friday night.

TMZ first reported that the restaurant’s owner kicked out Sanders and her family out of “moral conviction.” 

>> Read more trending news 

A waiter posted on Facebook that Sanders was in the restaurant for “a total of two minutes” before being asked to leave.

Sanders confirmed the incident on Twitter.

“Last night I was told by the owner of Red Hen in Lexington, VA to leave because I work for @POTUS and I politely left,” Sanders tweeted Saturday. “Her actions say far more about her than about me. I always do my best to treat people, including those I disagree with, respectfully and will continue to do so.”

Sanders’ father, former Gov. Mike Huckabee, tweeted his support, saying it was an act of “bigotry.”

The Red Hen’s Facebook and Yelp pages were bombarded with reviews from people from both sides.

While some praised the restaurant, many others said the owner was being “intolerant.”

This comes after Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen bolted from a Washington, D.C. Mexican restaurant after protesters confronted her at her table -- with the blessing of the manager.

Watch: Driver plows into crowd of protesters in Pittsburgh, police hunt for driver

Police in Pittsburgh are searching for the driver of a dark sedan who drove through a crowd of protesters on Friday night. 

Officials told WPXI no one was hurt. 

This happened during the third straight night of protests related to the police shooting death of Antwon Rose, 17, who was killed during a traffic stop earlier in the week.

>>Read: Protesters gather in Pittsburgh for third straight night

The car plowed into the crowd near PNC Park, where fans were leaving a Pittsburgh Pirates baseball game.

>>Read: LIVE UPDATES: Car drives through crowd of protesters at PNC Park

One person at the scene Friday night tweeted, “Someone tried to drive through us, police responded in riot gear.”

Allegheny County police officials said that Rose was a passenger in a vehicle stopped in East Pittsburgh Tuesday night, because it fit the description of a car seen fleeing the area of a shooting in the nearby borough of North Braddock. 

As an officer handcuffed the driver of the car, which investigators said had bullet damage to the back window, Rose and a second passenger got out of the car and ran. 

Rose, who police officials said was shot three times, was taken to a hospital where he was pronounced dead. 

Police are now investigating reports that Rose may have fired a weapon during a drive-by shooting before his death, and he had gun powder residue on his hands.

In a statement to WPXI, Coleman McDonough, Allegheny County Police superintendent, stated that those claims are “false.”

“While ACPD does have a video showing the North Braddock incident, that video does NOT show Antwon Rose firing a gun. The information about gunshot residue is also false. Crime Lab reports are still pending and have not yet been issued,” McDonough said.

The East Pittsburgh police officer who fatally shot Rose has been identified as Michael Rosfeld.

>>Read: Officer was sworn in hours before killing unarmed teen, mayor says

He was sworn into the department just hours before the shooting, but has worked for several police forces, including the University of Pittsburgh.

No arrests have been made and investigations are ongoing.

U.S. House candidate Katie Arrington seriously hurt in wrong-way crash

Katie Arrington, a Republican congressional candidate in South Carolina is in the hospital with serious injuries after she was involved in a deadly wrong-way car crash Friday night.

Arrington was traveling in the passenger seat with a friend, when another driver traveling in the wrong direction hit their car, WSOC reports.

>> Read more trending news 

The driver of the other vehicle died at the scene, according to Sheriff's Capt. Roger Antonio. The driver of Arrington’s car, her friend Jacqueline Goff, also sustained serious injuries.

Arrington and Goff were driving to Hilton Head, where Arrington was scheduled to receive an award Saturday morning, her campaign posted on Twitter.

Arrington has suffered a fracture to her back, broken ribs and a partial collapse of a main artery in her leg.

She will have undergo surgery and will require more procedures and weeks of recovery, CNN reports.

Arrington is alert and recovering at the Medical University of South Carolina and her family is by her side.

President Donald Trump expressed his sympathies to Arrington via Twitter.

Arrington defeated U.S. Rep. Mark Sanford in his re-election bid last week.

Sanford also expressed his well-wishes to Arrington on Twitter.

Arrington’s Democratic opponent, Joe Cunningham, announced Saturday morning that he's suspending his campaign out of respect for Arrington's recovery.

“As we all know, Katie Arrington is an extremely strong woman and has tremendous faith and an incredibly supportive family," her campaign said on Twitter.

Death of Memphis soldier at Florida training camp is suspicious, family says

A soldier who disappeared from a National Guard base in Florida has been found dead in a wooded area of Camp Blanding, WHBQ reports.

Specialist Cayln McLemore’s death is now considered an “undetermined death investigation,” officials said.

McLemore’s sister and cousin told WHBQ they think authorities are keeping information from them. 

>> Read more trending news 

“They smiled in our faces and didn't even tell us he was dead,” his sister, Cura McLemore, said. 

McLemore was participating in a land navigation assignment on Wednesday. It was a military training class of the Basic Leader Course at Camp Blanding's 211th Regiment Regional Training Institute.

He was last seen around 11 a.m. and did not return, authorities said.

Canines, mounted patrol and the Jacksonville Sheriff's Office, helped Clay County Sheriff's Office search for McLemore.

Some of McLemore's equipment -- water, food, paperwork and a tool to navigate -- was located by search teams.

Cura McLemore told WHBQ that authorities told the family that he had died -- but not how.

“I want my brother back with me,” Cura McLemore said. “That's my best friend. The only friend I have.”

Shannon Mayes, McLemore’s cousin, said something isn’t sitting right with her, after they found out McLemore had a cell phone on him. 

“Why he didn’t use that cell phone?” she said.

The family told WHBQ they suspect something is being covered up, because they cannot figure out why he wouldn’t make any calls if he knew he was in danger. 

“How can a cell phone go dead?” Mayes said. “You would have made a call when you feel like something is wrong.”

Nothing has indicated anything suspicious about McClure’s disappearance or that he's AWOL, authorities said.

Officials believe he may have become disoriented and dehydrated in the heat.

Ohio declares hepatitis A outbreak; joins growing list of states

Ohio is experiencing a statewide outbreak of hepatitis A, with 79 cases so far this year.

The Ohio Department of Health declared a statewide community outbreak of hepatitis A Friday evening.

Drug use, homelessness and incarceration are all risk factors, Ohio Department of Health officials said. Those who share needles or use street drugs -- injected or not -- are especially at risk. 

Outbreaks of hepatitis A are happening in several states across the U.S., including the neighboring states of Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan and West Virginia.

Arkansas, California, Kentucky, Missouri and Utah are also experiencing outbreaks of hepatitis A, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

>> Read more trending news 

Hepatitis A is a liver disease that is preventable through a vaccine. It is usually spread when a person ingests fecal matter -- even in microscopic amounts. This can happen through sharing food or drinks that are contaminated by the stool from an infected person. It can be spread through close personal contact, including sex, according to health officials.

Symptoms include fatigue, low appetite, jaundice and stomach pain. People with hepatitis A can experience mild illness lasting a few weeks to a severe illness lasting several months.

Gay rights pioneer Dick Leitsch, who orchestrated 'Sip-In,' dead at 83

Dick Leitsch, whose milestone “Sip-In” in 1966 ensured the right of gay patrons to be served in a licensed bar, died Friday, The New York Times reported. He was 83.

>> Read more trending news 

The cause of death was liver cancer, according to Paul Havern, a friend. That was confirmed by Leitsch’s niece, Cheryl Williams, The Washington Post reported.

On April 21, 1966, Leitsch and three friends -- Craig Rodwell, John Timmons and Randy Wicker, along with a Times reporter and Village Voice photographer Fred W. McDarrah -- staged the “sip-in” at Julius’, a bar in the Greenwich Village section of Manhattan. The “sip-in” was a variation of the nonviolent civil disobedience practiced by civil rights activists.

When Leitsch announced he and his friends were homosexuals, the bartender covered his glass and refused to serve the group. McDarrah snapped a photograph, and the Times published a story the next day, titled “3 Deviates Invite Exclusion By Bars.”

The Mattachine Society, a gay group that counted Leitsch among its leaders, threatened to sue the New York State Liquor Authority to overturn the policy that prohibited bars from knowingly serving alcoholic drinks to gays, the Times reported.

The lawsuit was never filed. Leitsch, in an interview with the Times in March, said “The whole thing was bizarre.”

“We didn’t need to prove that the bars refused to serve us, or that the liquor authority revoked licenses for serving gays,” Leitsch told the newspaper. “They denied ever doing it.”

The publicity led to a Mattachine lawsuit in New Jersey, the Post reported. In 1967, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that “well-behaved homosexuals” could not be barred from a drink, the Post reported.

“In our culture, homosexuals are indeed unfortunates,” the New Jersey ruling said. But “their status does not make them criminals or outlaws.”

Richard Joseph Leitsch was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on May 11, 1935. Survivors include a brother and sister. His partner of 17 years, Timothy Scoffield, was diagnosed with AIDS and died in 1989, the Post reported.

Lawsuit: Mistaken identity lands woman in Georgia jail for 2 days

Jessica Ellison’s nightmare began with a broken taillight and a case of mistaken identity.

It ended with two days in jail, a worried family and a lost job -- and now a lawsuit, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

“This reads as the script for some kind of dark comedy, where your protagonist cannot get anything to go right,” Ellison’s attorney, Nathan Lock, said.

>> Read more trending news 

Lock filed a lawsuit this week in U.S. District Court in Atlanta on Ellison’s behalf. Among the named defendants are Gwinnett County Sheriff Butch Conway, Corizon Health, which at the time of the incident provided health care services at the jail, and Gwinnett County police Officer Mark Ferrell.

It accuses each defendant of negligence.

The sheriff’s office and police department both declined to comment on the case. In the lawsuit, Lock describes the incident as follows.

Ellison, a property manager from Jonesboro, Georgia, was driving through Gwinnett County on the afternoon of June 21, 2016, when she got stopped near Duluth by GCPD Officer Mark Ferrell. Ferrell told her she had a taillight out and he was going to give her a warning, but he needed to run her license.

According to Ferrell’s incident report, he subsequently found a warrant out of Bartow County for a woman named Jessica Ellison. The birthdates matched, and dispatch verified the warrant -- for failure to appear on a then-three-year-old shoplifting charge -- was still active.

Ellison was taken to jail.

There was one problem. She and her lawyer now say the warrant was for a Jessica Ellis, not “Ellison.”

Upon arriving at the jail, Ellison was fingerprinted and, despite her “repeated” pleas about the arrest being a mistake, those fingerprints were never compared to those of the wanted woman, the lawsuit claims.

“There’s a lot of different things that could’ve been verified that would’ve distinguished the two,” Lock said.

Ellison spent the next two days in jail waiting for authorities to pick her up. During that time, the lawsuit claims, she was not allowed a phone call -- leaving her family and her job to wonder where she was -- and never saw a nurse despite repeated requests.

Ellison takes supplements to prevent seizures.

She didn’t have one in jail, Lock said, but did shortly after arriving home — which was only possible after the Bartow County deputy that arrived to transport her double-checked her information and was “immediately able to verify” she was the wrong woman.

Lock said the seizure came while she was cleaning up feces and urine from her dog, who was alone and unfed the entire time she was incarcerated.

Ellison also lost her job, according to the suit, which asks for unspecified compensation.

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