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Delta debuts uniforms in ‘Passport Plum’ with launch Tuesday

Delta Air Lines is about to debut its new uniforms for flight attendants and other employees with designer Zac Posen.

>> Read more trending news 

Atlanta-based Delta has been preparing for months for the Tuesday launch of the new uniforms.

Posen will make an appearance at New York’s LaGuardia Airport on Monday afternoon, around the same time that the first crew wearing the new uniforms for the debut will take off in Singapore for a flight to Tokyo. By that time, it will be early Tuesday morning in Singapore.

Posen will then appear at a Delta fashion show at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport early Tuesday morning in Atlanta, as employees don the new uniforms on flights and at airports across the carrier’s operations.

>> Related: Delta to debut new uniforms across airline in May

While Delta employees have for years worn dark blue and red uniforms, the new collection includes a color the airline dubs “Passport Plum.”

Former President George H.W. Bush back in the hospital in Maine with low blood pressure

Former President George H.W. Bush is back in the hospital, according to a family spokesman.

>> Read more trending news 

Bush was taken to Southern Maine Health Care Sunday “after experiencing low blood pressure and fatigue,” his spokesman Jim McGrath said on Twitter.

The former president is described as “awake and alert” and will probably remain hospitalized for a few days for observation, McGrath said.

Bush was most recently hospitalized in Houston on April 22, one day after the funeral and burial of his wife of 73 years, Barbara Bush.

During that hospital stay, he was diagnosed with an infection that had spread to his blood, doctors said at the time, but he recovered and eventually went home.

>> Related: George H.W. Bush remains hospitalized; doctors 'very pleased' with progress, spokesman says

At the time he said he was looking forward to visiting the family’s compound in Kennebunkport, Maine.

Bush was out and about Saturday, marking the Memorial Day holiday, joining a group of veterans at American Legion Post 159 for a pancake breakfast in Kennebunkport.

“Delighted to join the veterans, including my dear friend Gen. Brent Scowcroft,” Bush tweeted.

>> Related: George H.W. Bush: 9 things to know about the 41st president of the United States

Scowcroft was National Security Adviser during the presidencies of both Bush and Gerald Ford.

“This weekend we remember, and thank, all who have given their lives for our great country,” he said Saturday.

George Bush has a form of Parkinson's disease and uses a motorized scooter or wheelchair to get around. 

He was the youngest naval aviator when he enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve in 1943, spurred by the attack on Pearl Harbor.

He flew 58 combat missions during World War II and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his bravery.

>> Related: PHOTOS: George H. W. Bush through the years

He had six children with Barbara Bush, and in 1989, he became the first sitting vice president to secure the presidency since 1837.

'Grading' of Trump letter by retired teacher in Atlanta goes viral

A retired schoolteacher who lives in Atlanta wasn’t too impressed with the response she received earlier this month after writing President Donald Trump - so like any teacher, Yvonne Mason marked up the letter and sent it back to the White House. 

>> Read more trending news 

Mason, who spent 17 years teaching in South Carolina according to the Greenville News, had written Trump about school safety after the Parkland, Florida, school shooting, asking the president to meet with the families of the victims. 

Since retiring last year, Mason has started a project to send the president a post card every day for a year, according to the Greenville News. 

While the letter does bear Trump’s signature, it is almost certainly a form letter response - making the inconsistent capitalization and minor grammatical errors more puzzling. 

"When you get letters from the highest level of government, you expect them to be at least mechanically correct," Mason told the newspaper.

After Mason posted a picture of the letter on Facebook, the story has been picked up by a number of publications, including the Huffington Post and The Hill, and her original post has more than 300 comments and 200 shares.

>> Related: Wait, State of the what? Ticket to speech misspelled

While many of the commentators on her post seem more inclined to debate partisan issues than grammatical style, Mason seems relatively bipartisan in her writing reviews: 

"Lindsey Graham, or his people, writes exquisite letters," Mason told the Greenville newspaper. "I give him credit for that. They are far more on-topic. I understand the nature of form letters, but Graham's are written as if they're addressing your particular concern."

Reports: 1,500 immigrant children missing, feds say they’re not responsible

The federal government has admitted that it does not know the whereabouts of almost 1,500 immigrant children in its custody, according to news reports.

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The Office of Refugee Resettlement took in some 40,000 immigrant children in 2017 and when the agency reached out to check on more than 7,000 of them between October and December of 2017, 1,475 were unaccounted for at the end of the year, CNN reported.

The news came as the Trump administration cracks down on undocumented immigrants, threatening to separate more children from their families if the families are caught entering the United States illegally, in a new policy move.

In testimony before Congress earlier this month, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Neilsen said the children of illegal immigrants are transferred to the Department of Health and Human Services within 48 hours after they are taken into custody, and DHHS officials then find sponsored homes for them, USA Today reported.

Nielsen said separations like this happen in the U.S. every day.

Top DHHS official Steven Wagner testified before a Congressional subcommittee last month during a hearing on the Office of Refugee Resettlement that the ORR was “was unable to determine with certainty the whereabouts of 1,475 children,” and that 28 more had run away, CNN reported.

“I understand that it has been HHS’ long-standing interpretation of the law that ORR is not legally responsible for the children after they are released from ORR care,” Wagner said. 

>> Related: Woman arrested for stealing a salad now facing deportation

Wagner also said DHHS is “taking a fresh look at that question,” according to CNN, but he also said ORR would need a lot more money if the office is expected to be legally responsible for unaccompanied immigrant children.

Younger white and Hispanic women more likely to get lung cancer than men, study finds

Lung cancer is the deadliest cancer, with an estimated 154,050 deaths projected for 2018, according to the National Cancer Institute. Unfortunately, some groups are more likely to be diagnosed than others.

>> Read more trending news 

Researchers from the NCH and American Cancer Society recently conducted a study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, to find out. 

For the assessment, they examined lung cancer data of adults aged 30 to 54 from 1995 to 2014. They gathered information on sex, race or ethnic group, age, year of diagnosis and year of birth.

While previous research revealed men were more likely to be diagnosed, the new data suggests otherwise.

>> Related: High-risk smokers aren’t getting tested for lung cancer, study suggests

Overall, men were still more likely than women to have lung cancer when all races and ages were combined, but researchers noticed new patterns after closely assessing the different age and race groups.

Younger white and Hispanic women born since 1965 are now more likely to have lung cancer than white and Hispanic men, the researchers found. 

For example, incidence rates for white women surpassed white men in nearly every age group examined. Rates of lung cancer among white women aged 40 to 44 went from 12 percent lower than men during the 1995-1999 period to 17 percent higher during the 2010-2014 period.

>> Related: Immune therapy plus chemo doubles lung cancer survival, study says

For black and Asian groups, the women rates inched closer to those of the men but did not exceed them.

In a statement, researchers said they were surprised by the results. While they are still exploring why the switch has occurred, they noted smoking patterns did not explain the change. 

“While prevalence of smoking among men and women has converged over the past several decades, smoking prevalence among women has still generally not exceeded that of men,” lead author Ahmedin Jemal said. “We do not believe sex differences in smoking behavior explain our finding of a gender crossover.”

>> Related: This new cancer 'vaccine' completely wipes out tumors in mice — and human trials are on the way

On the other hand, they do believe women more than men may be more susceptible to the health hazards of cigarette smoking. They explained that women may also be more likely to get lung cancer even after they quit smoking, but more research needs to be done. 

Subtropical Storm Alberto strengthens bringing gusty winds, heavy rains, storm surge to Gulf region

Tropical storm warnings are up across Florida and along parts of the Gulf Coast as Subtropical Storm Alberto lumbers across the Gulf of Mexico ruining Memorial Day holiday plans for thousands of vacationers.

>> Read more trending news

Update May 27, 2018 5:05 p.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto continues to move north, north west with no change in strength.

The Tropical Storm Warning along the west coast of Florida south of the Anclote River has ended, according to the National Hurricane Center

The Storm Surge Warning for the northern Gulf Coast of west of Navarre, Florida has ended. 

Update May 27, 2018 11 a.m. EDT: Subtropical Storm Alberto is strengthening with wind speeds clocked at 50 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center, or NHC. The storm is moving north at 14 mph and it’s located about 130 miles southwest of Tampa.

Isolated tornadoes are possible as Alberto closes in on the region. Forecasters are predicting Alberto will make landfall sometime late Sunday or Monday, bringing gusty winds, heavy rain, flash flooding and storm surge to parts of the Gulf Coast.

>> Related: Alberto: PBC saw up to 3 inches of rain last night; expect more Sunday

“Alberto is expected to produce heavy rainfall with a risk of flooding and flash flooding over western Cuba, the Florida Keys and south Florida today. The risk for heavy rainfall and flooding will then spread over much of the southeast U.S. tonight and Monday,” according to the NHC.

The NHC is warning of “dangerous surf and rip current conditions” along parts of the eastern and northern Gulf Coast through Monday.

>> Related: Alberto starts to bring rain to Central Florida as storm moves north

(Previous Story)

A tropical storm warning has been issued for parts of the Florida Gulf Coast including from Bonita Beach to the Anclote River as well as north near the Aucilla River to the Mississippi/Alabama border, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A tropical storm warning means tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

Heavy rainfall is expected as the storm, with sustained winds of 40 mph, continues to move at 13 mph through the Dry Tortugas. 

A storm surge watch has also been issued for parts of Florida and the Mississippi/Alabama border, officials said

The latest forecast ends the tropical storm and storm surge watch for parts of Louisiana. 

Dog abandoned with ‘free,’ ‘good home only’ written on it in permanent marker

A young dog found abandoned in a park in Ross County, Ohio, had the words “free” and “good home only” written on it in permanent marker, according to a post on social media.

>> Read more trending news 

“I usually try to contain myself with my work life and what I see every single day, but this just tops it off!” Brittany May with the Ross County Humane Society said in a post on Facebook.

Whoever did this has “reached a whole new level of LOW,” May wrote.

“How are you going to dump your dog, and write FREE all over it in permanent marker! I just don’t get it!” she said

The good news is the five to six month-old female, Labrador-mix, named Marvella by the agency, will soon have a new home, May told WSYX-TV. The dog is now up for adoption.

Antidepressants may be linked to  obesity, study says

A poor diet and lack of exercise can contribute to obesity. However, antidepressants may also play a role, according to a new report.

>> Read more trending news 

Researchers from health institutions in Europe recently conducted a study, published in the BMJ journal, to determine the link between antidepressants and weight gain. 

To do so, they analyzed 295,000 people from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink, a large collection of electronic health records. They examined how often the individuals, who were of all sizes, took antidepressants as well as their weight gain over time. They also considered factors, including age, chronic disease diagnoses, smoking status and taking other drugs.

>> Related: Cough syrup and antidepressant caused scary interaction 

After analyzing the results, they found that those were prescribed antidepressants during the first year of the study were 21 percent more likely to have gained weight. These subjects gained at least 5 percent of their starting body weight over a 10-year period, compared to those were not on the drugs. 

“Patients who were normal weight were more likely to transition to overweight, and overweight patients were more likely to transition to obesity if they were treated with antidepressants,” co-author Rafael Gafoor told TIME.

>> Related: Here's why weight gain causes loss of taste buds, study says 

Furthermore, they discovered that some medications were more strongly associated with weight gain than others.

People who took mirtazapine were 50 percent more likely to gain weight, and those who took citalopram had a 26 percent higher risk of weight gain.

The researchers did note some limitations. They said the medical regimens of some patients may have influenced their diets, and that depressive symptoms, such as increased appetite and decreased motivation to exercise, may have contributed to weight gain. 

Despite the findings, the researchers said antidepressants are still useful and patients should be aware of the potential risks. 

>> Related: Weight loss and marriage: Study shows good marriage can keep you thin

“A variety of factors need to be taken into account when prescribing any given antidepressant,” Gafoor said. “The best advice is to have an open, informed conversation with your prescriber if weight gain (or any other side effect) is bothersome.”

'I think he was trying to kill me:' officer fights off assault by motorist during stop

A Norwood, North Carolina, police officer fought off an assault during a traffic stop Friday night near Norwood Elementary School, Norwood town officials told WSOC-TV.

Authorities said just before 9 p.m., Norwood Detective Michael Hodgson completed a traffic stop of a car, which quickly turned into a dangerous situation that left the officer fighting to stay alive.

Hodgson stopped a motorist for having a defective headlight, and was then pulled into the car by the motorist who sped away with the door still open, officials said.

Hodgson held on with his legs dangling outside of the moving vehicle at speeds estimated above 80 mph, while the driver continued to kick, punch and fight him, officials said.

“He was trying to physically harm me and/or kill me. I think he was trying to kill me,” Hodgson told Norwood officials in an audio recording obtained by WSOC-TV. "He had to have been rolling at least 70, 80, 90 miles an hour with my legs dangling out (of) the car."

The driver, Timothy Robinson, was in jail for less than 12 hours. He paid more than $112,000 to bail out, which is 15 percent of his $750,000 bond.

The driver admitted he had a weapon on him and surrendered it. Moments after being asked to step out of the car, the detective continued his search.

“I had my back turned to the driver side door and he charges me, slams me up against (sic), jumps in the car. He grabs my shirt and pulls me,” Hodgson said in the recording.Officials said the driver commented that “when they got to the bridge, they would both die tonight.”

“The suspect told Detective Hodgson, ‘I'm going to kill you tonight and I'm going to kill myself and I'm going to run us off the bridge," Norwood Police Chief James Wilson said.

Officials said as they approached the Rocky River bridge south of Norwood, the driver appeared to be intentionally directing the vehicle into the bridge, but Hodgson wrestled the steering wheel left as they approached the bridge to stay on the roadway, officials said.

At one point, Hodgson stunned Robinson with a Taser, got control of the steering wheel and forced the car off the road onto Highway 52 in Anson County.

Officials said the car went over an embankment, went airborne, clipped trees and came to a stop in a private backyard.

Hodgson pursued the driver and tackled him before officers assisted in the arrest.

“Last night, Norwood could have too been mourning the loss of another dedicated law enforcement officer,” said town administrator John Mullis. “By the grace of God, the event did not turn tragic. After interviewing Detective Hodgson, I am absolutely amazed at his thought processes as we ran through the previous event together.”

“Absolutely, this is a miracle,” Wilson said.

Robinson faces charges of assault to a law enforcement officer with a firearm, attempted first-degree murder, injury to personal property, resisting a public officer, kidnapping and trafficking in cocaine, among others.

Graduating senior in Pennsylvania upset school won't let her wear Army sash

A father is frustrated after being told his daughter couldn't wear a U.S. Army sash for her high school graduation.

>> Read more trending news

Wayne Kress' daughter Toni is graduating from Central Valley in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, on June 1, and she's already signed enlistment papers to join the Army. But the school won't let her wear an Army sash.

“I’m very disappointed in the school,” said Wayne Kress.

Administrators told her it’s because it doesn’t match the school colors.

WPXI did some digging through Central Valley's dress code as well as the graduation requirements, and didn't find anything about wearing a sash for graduation.

For Toni, it’s a matter of pride.

“This is such a huge accomplishment for me,” she said. “Volunteering to fight for this country.”

The school did not want to comment on the issue

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